Security Firm Sophos Raises $125M In UK IPO, Valuing It At $1.6B

TechCrunch

As malicious hacks, data breaches and other forms of cyber crime continue to persist in our networked, Internet-connected world, Sophos, a maker of antivirus software, firewall hardware and other security products for networks, individual users and servers, is going public on the London Stock Exchange.

Trading now as Sophos Group plc and using the “SOPH” ticker, the company sold 34.8% of its shares at 225 pence each (or 156,521,740 shares), raising $125 million on a valuation of £1.013 billion ($1.6 billion) — making it the latest tech “unicorn” to come out of the UK.

“Today marks a significant milestone for all of us at Sophos,” said Kris Hagerman, CEO of Sophos, in a statement. “We are proud to be part of Britain’s growing tech economy as a listed business and a leading global provider in the cyber security sector.  Working with our 15,000 channel partners worldwide, we look forward to the next stage of…

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New Process Can Print Stretchy Electronics Onto Your Clothes

TechCrunch

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have created a single-step process to print conductive material on cloth, allowing manufacturers to build stretchable wearables that can test vital signs like heart rate and muscle contraction.

From the release:

Now, Professor Takao Someya’s research group at the University of Tokyo’s Graduate School of Engineering has developed an elastic conducting ink that is easily printed on textiles and patterned in a single printing step. This ink is comprised of silver flakes, organic solvent, fluorine rubber and fluorine surfactant. The ink exhibited high conductivity even when it was stretched to more than three times its original length, which marks the highest value reported for stretchable conductors that can be extended to more than two and a half times their original length.

Why is this important? Because it allows for the traces to and from electronic components to be amazingly stretchy. While components like…

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The Future Is Here, It’s Just Unevenly Distributed Systems

TechCrunch

Hearken to me, my fellow developers. We live in complex and confusing times. Once we sought to make things ever simpler. Then we discovered that simple isn’t necessarily scalable, or efficient, or resilient, and turned to favoring composition over simplicity, deconstructing our systems into multiple independent services. And now–well–now it sometimes seems that we have hit upon the worst of all worlds.

That would explain the eruption of enthusiasm for what has quickly become a whole genre of darkly funny technical blog posts that made the rounds this month, (fondly) mocking modern software development and the paralyzing ever-growing profusion of tools, systems, and frameworks, a plethora crossed with a Lernaean hydra. I have been known to call the resulting selection anxiety Developaralysis.

CircleCI‘s founder Paul Biggar led off the parade of dark technical comedy with a post that’s already a classic of its kind, proclaiming “It’s…

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The Battery Breakthrough That Could Juice U.S. Manufacturing

Longreads

In a new report, McKinsey describes a broad new age of manufacturing that it calls Industry 4.0. The consulting firm says the changes under way are affecting most businesses. They are probably not “another industrial revolution,” it says, but together, there is “strong potential to change the way factories work.”

For decades, the US has watched its bedrock manufacturing industries wither away, as they’ve instead grown thick in Japan, in South Korea, in China, Taiwan and elsewhere in Asia. According to the Economic Policy Institute, the US lost about 5 million manufacturing jobs just from 1997 to 2014. This includes the production of lithium-ion batteries, which, though invented by Americans, were commercialized in Japan and later South Korea and China.

So Chiang’s innovation could be a poster-child for a new strain of thinking in the US. This says that, while such industries are not likely to return from Asia…

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